ohthelifeofanenglishmajor
  • (I am working the register over Christmas.)
  • Me: “Find everything today?”
  • Customer: “Yup.”
  • (Note: she is silent through the transaction, which includes a gift card.)
  • Me: “How much would you like on this?”
  • Customer: “Oh, sorry. Can I have $150?”
  • Me: “No problem.”
  • Customer: *after paying* “Can you do me a favor?” *she hands me the gift card* “The next customer you see that you think could use this, could you give it to them?”
  • Me: *stunned* “…Of course!”
  • (After a minute another customer comes up, a visibly upset young woman.)
  • Me: “Hi! How are you?”
  • Customer #2: “I’m okay, thanks.”
  • (Clearly she is not ok, but she is trying very hard to be pleasant. She is getting very basic items: milk, bread, eggs, etc. Nothing very festive.)
  • Me: “So your total comes out to $0.00.”
  • Customer: “What?”
  • Me: “The person before you gave me a $150 gift card to use for the next person I thought could use it. You look like you’re having a rough day, so here are your groceries, and there’s about $130 left on this card.”
  • (The customer just started crying. Once she could, she thanked me about 100 times. Made my whole Christmas season.)
opus-vancouver

opus-vancouver:

And the beat goes on

The Beat Generation began in the late 1940s as a group of friends who refused to conform. They were a table of writers - Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady and William S. Burroughs - who had grand ideas about sexuality, drugs, materialism, individualism, and life in general.

It was about being a free spirit, living a life rich with experience, seeking adventure, and embracing the different. And they wrote as though their words sang jazz.

Try some beat slang in OPUS Bar this month:

Dixie fried = drunk

Claws sharp = all knowing about everything

Quail hunting = picking up ladies

Jungled up = your living arrangements

A shape in a drape = a well-dressed person

Making the scene = in the right place at the right time

Back seat bingo = car makeouts

Last week, Kill Your Darlings, a film about Allen Ginsberg’s role in the generation as a beat poet, was released into theatres. Starring Daniel Radcliffe as Ginsberg, Dane DeHaan as Lucien Carr, Jack Huston as Jack Kerouac, and Ben Foster as William Burroughs, the film articulates how a young man turns into a literary figure.

“Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness.” ~ Allen Ginsberg

WATCH THE TRAILER

~Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

theliteraryalchemist
History says don’t hope
On this side of the grave.
But then, once in a lifetime
The longed for tidal wave
Of justice can rise up
And hope and history rhyme.
So hope for a great sea-change
on the far side of revenge.
Believe that a further shore
is reachable from here.
Believe in miracles
and cures and healing wells.
an excerpt from The Cure at Troy: A Version of Sophocles’ ‘Philoctetes’ (1991) by Seamus Heaney (13 April 1939–30 August 2013)